EU's Tusk tells Johnson to stop playing 'stupid blame game' on Brexit

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Chancellor Angela Merkel (R) receives President of the European Council Donald Tusk at the Federal Chancellery.

According to the source, quoted in the British Spectator magazine, Johnson does not want a no-deal Brexit but he believes that negotiations with the European Union are failing, following frosty responses from Brussels on Monday to his proposed withdrawal deal.

Britain has been trying for more than three years to find a way to deliver on the result of a 2016 referendum and end its nearly five-decade involvement in the European bloc.

"For the United Kingdom to be asked to leave a part of its sovereign territory in a foreign organisation of which the UK would no longer be a part and over which we would have no say whatsoever is beyond insane". A spokesman for Merkel's office declined to comment on confidential conversations.

Johnson's official spokesman told reporters the pair had a "frank exchange" and that discussions were at a "critical point".

However, Tusk tweeted that Britain was playing with "the future of Europe and the UK" with no clear plan of what the country wanted.

The Irish prime minister - who is expected to meet Mr Johnson in Dublin on Thursday or Friday - said he would work "until the very last moment" to try to secure a deal.

The 2 are anticipated to fulfill for talks later this week, in line with the Press Affiliation.

Under a proposed U.K. Brexit plan there would be customs checks, but Britain says they could be conducted away from Northern Ireland's border.

However a lot of the main target is shifting to what occurs if the Brexit talks are formally pronounced lifeless.

The pound started the day under pressure, down 0.1% against the euro and flat against the dollar at a one-month low.

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But he warned that a "wide difference" remained over the UK's proposals to replace the backstop mechanism for maintaining an open Irish border.

On Tuesday, the government suspended the legislature from Wednesday until October 14, when Queen Elizabeth II will set out the government's legislative domestic agenda.

Johnson unveiled a new plan last week aimed at keeping Britain's border with European Union member Ireland free-flowing after Brexit - a crucial issue in the divorce talks between Brussels and London.

Following a telephone call with Boris Johnson, she was said to have insisted the Irish must have a veto over Northern Ireland leaving the customs union.

Mr Varadkar added that it was his job to hold the United Kingdom to commitments it had made since the 2016 referendum to prevent a hard border on the island of Ireland and uphold the Good Friday Agreement.

While the Times newspaper did not specify how many Conservative lawmakers oppose a no-deal scenario, the Financial Times reported early on Wednesday that at least 50 members of parliament from the party will revolt against a general election manifesto pledging to pursue a no-deal Brexit.

Downing Road officers say Brussels is making an enormous mistake as a result of failure within the coming days to succeed in a deal would end in Britain's place exclusively hardening down the road.

BREXIT BLAME GAME An array of remarks by unidentified British sources laid bare just how far apart the two sides are after three years of tortuous haggling over the first departure of a sovereign state from the EU.

The FTSE 100 has also struggled since the turn of the month, falling by 3.39% to 7195 as United Kingdom companies grow fearful of the increasingly likely potential of a no-deal Brexit.

"And under no circumstances will we accept that the European Union wants to do harm to the Good Friday Agreement".

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