Peacock Is NBC's New Ad-Supported Streaming Service

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NBCUniversal will join the growing ranks of new streaming services, including - but definitely not limited to - Apple TV+, Disney+, and HBO Max.

Battlestar Galactica is getting yet another TV reboot, this time from Mr. Robot creator Sam Esmail.

Comcast Corp.'s NBCUniversal will name its upcoming streaming service "Peacock", offering a broad slate of original content, including "Dr Death" starring Emmy and Golden Globe victor Alec Baldwin, the company said on Tuesday.

The new Battlestar Galactica was announced as part of the overall initial lineup for Peacock, but it was easy to lose track of amidst the Saved by the Bell reboot news and the general fact that pop culture obsessives now have yet another streaming service to keep track of if they want to keep watching shows like 30 Rock.

A Saved By the Bell reboot has been officially saved by NBCUniversal's upcoming streaming platform.

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NBCUniversal hasn't announced yet how much Peacock will cost, but it's believed Comcast subscribers will get it for free. The hit series, which aired on NBC from 1989 to 1993, is finally getting a sequel. "Peacock will be the go-to place for both the timely and timeless - from can't-miss Olympic moments and the 2020 election, to classic fan favorites like The Office".

Peacock is scheduled to launch in April 2020, although a launch date for this new Battlestar Galactica has not been specified. UCP's "Queer as Folk" reboot and "One of Us is Lying" had also moved their development over to Peacock from Bravo and E!, respectively.

Still TBD: Peacock's pricing at launch.

We already knew all episodes of The Office would be heading to the service, but now so are all episodes of Parks and Recreation. And NBC also took a stab at a niche comedy-focused paid streaming service Seeso in 2014, but it folded less than three years later.

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