Apple Music web player is the beta we’ve been waiting for

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Popular music streaming service Apple Music, which has over 60 million monthly users worldwide is finally focusing on improving the Android version of its app.

Now available in Beta, the new web app offers a similar user experience to the new Apple Music app on the Mac, offering dedicated tabs for For You, Browse, and Radio, as well as porting over any playlists and recommendations from Apple Music on macOS and iOS. The new web player interface resembles the Music app for macOS, but it can be accessed through a web browser, meaning on Windows 10 devices and even Chromebooks.

If you run a computer music setup, it's always advisable to hold off from upgrading to any new version of your operating system, as there will invariably be teething problems that might cause issues with your software or hardware. But Apple claims that over time it will add all the functionality. Interested users may go on to beta.music.apple.com to begin streaming Apple Music around the net. Now, anyone can access their Apple Music account through any web browser.

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Users can stream music from Apple Music straight from their browser.

Since I no longer subscribe to Apple Music - I moved to a Spotify student plan about a year ago - all I can do is preview songs on the web. That said, it is a bit silly to try to use the web app on an iPhone when the native app is sitting on your homescreen, so it's not a big issue. You can access your entire music library but some sections such as "TV & Film" isn't accessible yet.

If you have an Apple Music subcription, feel free to give the web player a shot. Just about every feature you'd expect is there, except for the capability to upload music, smart playlists, some music videos, recently played custom radio stations, and curiously, Beats One radio.

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