Women's Rugby World Cup renamed for gender neutrality

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Unintentional gender bias in sport is an ongoing issue.

The move will ensure that the competitions have equal billing from a brand perspective, regardless of whether the events feature men or women.

The decision to drop genders from competition titles is a first for a major sporting federation and World Rugby believes it will "elevate the profile of the women's game, while eliminating any inherent or perceived bias towards men's only competitions and tournaments".

The Fiji Airways Flying Fijians will take on the Wallabies on the 21st of next month at 4.45pm in their first pool match of the Rugby World Cup.

"The goal is to elevate the profile of the women's game, while eliminating any inherent or perceived bias towards men's only competitions and tournaments, which traditionally haven't specified gender", a World Rugby statement said.

World Rugby have also been keen to point out an increase in interest and participation in women's rugby in general.

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Participation levels are at an all-time high with 2.7 million players globally - making up more than a quarter of the global playing population.

"We have been fighting for years to promote women's rugby and to tell the world it is OK to be a woman and play rugby". I am excited about this landmark decision but this is the beginning of the journey.

World Rugby has decided that its flagship 15s and 7s Rugby World Cup properties will no longer include gender in their titles. "We're very proud to be leading the sport industry in this space". "We are delighted that New Zealand is hosting Rugby World Cup 2021, and we look forward to the world's best teams in women's global rugby coming to our shores and taking part in a fantastic display of rugby".

The potential economic benefit of the World Cup is set to help the Japanese government's reach its targets to expand the country's sports-related market from 5.5 trillion yen (US$51.7 billion) in to 2015 to 10 trillion yen (US$94.1 billion) by 2020 and 15 trillion yen (US$141.1 billion) by 2025.

Ireland lost a seventh-placed playoff 27-17 to Wales in the same tournament.

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