SpaceX is going to deliver Nickelodeon slime to the International Space Station

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This spacecraft previously carried out missions to supply the space station in April 2015 and December 2017.

SpaceX will attempt another launch Thursday at 6:01 p.m. ET, although forecasters said similar weather will threaten the launch. The launch had originally been scheduled for July 24 but was scrubbed 30 seconds before liftoff due to poor weather conditions.

However, the Air Force's 45th Weather Squadron, which points launch weather forecasts for space missions departing Cape Canaveral, expects related situations on Thursday because of the spaceport experienced on Wednesday afternoon.

The spacecraft, which is now moving through orbit with its solar panels deployed, is scheduled to arrive at the space station on Saturday.

Meanwhile, the second stage fired its lone Merlin Vacuum engine to finish the job of sending the CRS-18 Dragon on its way to the orbiting lab. It launched sporting an Apollo 50th anniversary logo near the side hatch to commemorate the 1969 moon landing.

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When you live in your office, downtime can be hard to come by, but an upcoming supply mission will provide the ISS inhabitants with some very special "tools" that will surely put some smiles on their faces. That adaptor saw some action for the first time this March when SpaceX's new Crew Dragon capsule automatically docked with the port during an uncrewed test flight.

The mission will be SpaceX's 18th cargo flight to the space station under a Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA, the release added.

Once launched, the Dragon spacecraft will take about two days to reach to International Space Station.

NASA pays private companies SpaceX and Northrop Grumman to ship supplies to the station. The CRS-18 mission may be business as usual, but a rocket launch is always a majestic sight.

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