Cannes idol Gomez says social media ‘terrible’ for her generation

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"They are not really aware of everything going on". In the Cannes opening night film, even the zombies tote cell phones, and when asked about the influence of social media in the current culture at the film's Wednesday morning press conference, Gomez got honest. "The Dead Don't Die", the zombie/horror film she's cast in, features an A-list roster of names including Tilda Swinton, Adam Driver, Bill Murray and Chloe Sevigny, all of whom joined Gomez for the premiere.

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"I think our world is going through a lot". "I'm grateful I have the platform". According to Murray, he told Vanity Fair, "I don't remember what I said", adding, "I was trying to keep her at ease". "It's selfish - I don't wanna say selfish because it feels rude - but it's unsafe for sure". "I don't take a lot of pointless pictures I like to be intentional with it". Last night, the way she carried herself with panache has got everyone raving about her. "I obviously wanted to create something that matches my lifestyle and that shows the real me - I've said it before, I need something that's comfortable and flattering, pieces that I can just put on and give the impression it took me hours to plan. I don't think people are getting the right information sometimes". She also said she tries to be conscious when posting on Instagram, to avoid putting unnecessary pressure on her fans.

Jarmusch's film, a tribute to the George Romero monster movies of the 1960s and 70s, depicts a small town in Trump-era America facing an infestation of flesh-eating zombies, including one played by Jarmusch's friend Iggy Pop.

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Gomez plays a "big city hipster" visiting the town who falls victim to an ambush of zombies, who moan for the creature comforts they craved in life like wifi, Xanax and chardonnay wine. Just know that most of it isn't real. So for me, the work that I choose and the brands that I align with [include] people who are willing to move that conversation forward.

The 68-year-old revealed he's "a better person when working on a film".

"This is how I operate", he added, "this is my little ice flow that I stand on and I hope it doesn't melt".

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