Julian Assange accused of setting up 'spy centre' in Ecuadorian embassy

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Moreno also reiterated the claim made by the Ecuadorean government that Assange's hygiene and behavior constituted an "aggressive campaign against Ecuador" from inside the embassy.

Julian Assange has been accused of trying to create a "centre for spying" in the Ecuadorian embassy that sheltered him.

Julian Assange, dressed in a vest and shorts, skateboards around his bedroom in the Ecuadorian embassy.

Ecuadoran President Lenin Moreno on Sunday defended his decision to overturn Julian Assange's asylum status, claiming in an interview with the Guardian newspaper that the WikiLeaks founder had tried to set up a "centre for spying" in Ecuador's London embassy.

"We can not allow our house, the house that opened its door to become a centre for spying". He said he regretted that Assange had used the embassy to interfere in other country's democracies.

Oliver then detailed Assange's alleged offenses within the embassy, including skateboarding in the hallways, damaging equipment and his cat making a mess. He now faces jail for breaching bail and possible extradition to the US.

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"The politics of the case with respect with Ecuador's change of government with Lenin Moreno coming to power and ever since then inside the embassy it's become more and more hard to the point where Human Rights Watch said was akin to solitary confinement", she said.

President Moreno - who came to power in 2017 - said of the decision to end Assange's seven-year stay in the embassy: "Any attempt to destabilise is a reprehensible act for Ecuador, because we are a sovereign nation and respectful of the politics of each country".

In an interview with The Guardian, Moreno said Assange's actions "violate asylum conditions" and the country's decision to evict him was "not abitrary but based on worldwide law".

Other accusations from Ecuador have included that the WikiLeaks founder played loud music, left the cooker on, smeared feces over the walls of his bathroom and left some dirty underwear in the toilet.

Dubbed "Collateral Murder", the footage prompted worldwide concern over the conduct of U.S. forces stationed in the Middle East, something supporters of WikiLeaks argue remains behind Washington's renewed drive to extradite Assange to face charges in the United States.

The comments in an interview with The Guardian newspaper show the degradation of Assange's relationship with Ecuador, which allowed him to stay in the London embassy for almost seven years. The charge is in relation to Assange's alleged work with Chelsea Manning, a former US intelligence analyst, in cracking a password that helped Manning infiltrate Pentagon computers.

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