Trump Signs His First Veto After Congress Rejects His National Emergency

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Donald Trump has issued his first legislative veto since taking office, overruling Congress to protect his declaration of a national emergency to secure funds for a wall on the U.S. border with Mexico.

"Congress has the freedom to pass this resolution and I have the duty to veto it", he said.

The Senate voted Thursday by a margin of 59 to 41 to block Trump's declaration that an emergency on the border with Mexico requires the construction of a wall, a project for which Congress has not appropriated money.

It is unlikely that Congress will have the two-thirds majority required to override Trump's veto, though House Democrats have suggested they would try nonetheless.

Trump rejected entreaties from several Senate Republicans to agree to a compromise that would curtail his national emergency powers and instead framed the vote not as a matter of constitutional concerns, but rather as a litmus test on border security.

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Trump declared a national emergency last month, after Congress authorized only $1.3 billion in border wall funding, far short of the $5.7 billion Trump had asked for. "This is not about the president or border security, in fact I support border security, I support a barrier". The dozen senators who went against the White House were Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Roy Blunt of Missouri, Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania, Rand Paul of Kentucky, Rob Portman of Ohio, Marco Rubio of Florida, Jerry Moran of Kansas, Roger Wicker of MS, and Mitt Romney and Mike Lee, both of Utah.

She also says the president "is incredibly disappointed" with Republicans who voted against him. Mike Lee, R-Utah; Rob Portman, R-Ohio; Susan Collins, R-Maine; Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska; Marco Rubio, R-Fla.; Rand Paul, R-Ky.; Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn.; Roger Wicker, R-Miss.; Roy Blunt, R-Mo.; Jerry Moran, R-Kan.; and Pat Toomey, R-Pa.

The bill had passed the House in February with thirteen congressional Republicans crossing the aisle to join Democrats.

The declaration of an emergency allowed the administration to access over $6bn in additional funds not appropriated by Congress to build the wall.

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