Saudi rights official says pursuing justice for Khashoggi murder

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Turkey said on Thursday that Interpol had issued red notices - asking police worldwide to locate and provisionally arrest a person pending extradition - for 20 people regarding the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi. They were issued on March 1.

Interpol declined to comment on Thursday, Reuters said.

Turkey urged Saudi Arabia to extradite the perpetrators of the crime, as well as to provide information on the location of Khashoggi's body.

But the responses provided by Saudi Arabia in some cases fail to match the reality on the ground, and in others reflect an unwillingness to bring national laws and practices into conformity with worldwide law. He gave no names or details.

After making numerous contradictory statements, it said Khashoggi was killed after negotiations to persuade him to return to Saudi Arabia failed - and later that 11 Saudis had been indicted and referred for trial over the case, without identifying them.

It also criticized Aiban's rejection of any foreign investigation.

"Therefore what is being conveyed by certain media regarding the need for us to internationalise some of these matters is something we do not accept because such demands amount to interference in our domestic affairs and in our domestic judicial system", he told the Geneva forum.

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Al-Aiban spoke as the 47-member Human Rights Council conducted Thursday a regular review of Saudi Arabia's human rights record, a periodic process faced by all United Nations member states.

Regarding Yemen's crisis, he said the Arab Coalition is committed to global human rights law. More than a month after his death, the Central Intelligence Agency concluded Salman ordered Khashoggi's death.

The Trump administration imposed sanctions on 17 individuals in November, but these did not include several high-ranking Saudi officials implicated in the murder, including the Crown Prince.

After countries around the world, including every European Union member nation, encouraged Saudi Arabia to cooperate with an worldwide investigation into the Washington Post journalist's death, Bandar bin Mohammed al-Aiban responded Thursday, saying his country already took care of everything.

While Saudi Arabia has abolished the ban on women driving since its previous review, other government-enforced guardian restrictions remain in place, including on travel outside the country.

Agnes Callamard, UN investigator on extrajudicial executions, said that Saudi officials have not responded to requests to cooperate with her investigation into the murder.

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