New Poll Finds Americans Overwhelmingly Blame Trump More Than Democrats for Shutdown

Share

"And so in order to survive, he is taking positions and doing things that you and I would think make no sense at all, and don't fit everything we know about him as a person, but it fits what he thinks he needs to do in order to survive".

"We want Congress to do its job", the president said in a discussion on border security at the White House.

"Last we looked in one of the two funds there's about $1.2 billion of unobligated dollars", Cassidy said Saturday on Fox News.

"We don't want it to come down to a national emergency declaration", said House Republican Whip Steve Scalise of Louisiana. Thirteen percent blame both equally.

Separately, Puerto Rico's governor urged Trump to not redirect emergency funds from projects to help the storm-ravaged island to wall construction along the US-Mexico border.

Many lawmakers spent the weekend in their home states - often hearing constituents' complaints about the shutdown - but will return to Washington on Monday. He again sought to blame Democrats, who he said were "everywhere but Washington as people await their pay".

Trump reiterated his argument that crime, illegal drugs, and human trafficking are creating a national security and humanitarian crisis at the border, and that a wall is needed.

"Your families will get your paychecks", he told U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the agency's Washington headquarters.

Mr Trump said the Democrats "could solve the Shutdown in 15 minutes" and that he was "ready to sign" a deal.

"I would nearly say definitely", Trump said on Thursday when asked if he'd make such a move, the Times reported. Many Republicans are wary, too, fearing its use by a future Democratic president.

Gingrich said even if pockets of the Democratic party are against open borders, its political goals are not going tobe met unless they take down President Trump and whatever his agenda is.

More news: Federer 'sad and shocked' to learn of Murray retirement
More news: Wisconsin Bus Driver Rescues Little Boy Running Down Sidewalk Alone
More news: Withdrawal from Syria begun

Sen. Richard Durbin of IL, the No. 2 Democrat in the Senate, said on NBC News' "Meet the Press" that centrist Senate Republicans who sought to broker a deal last week should step forward and make an appeal to their party's leader in the chamber, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky.

But the measures are unlikely to be approved by the Senate, which is controlled by Mr Trump's Republicans.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi told reporters: "When the president acts, we will respond to whatever he does". "Whatever you want to call it, it's OK with me".

Sen. Chris Coons, Delaware Democrat, said Mr. Graham's advice to the president was solid.

Scaramucci said the fact the president made a pledge to build a wall the cornerstone of his campaign explains why he is "obsessed" with the plan now and described the fight as "an ego grudge they have to figure out a way to put aside".

Milstead steered clear of partisan finger-pointing, but he pushed back against critics who say the wall will not work.

Johnson also accused Democrats of minimizing what he called a "crisis" at a border. "As a candidate, this is what he talked about, and if there's any mandate he can claim from his election, it was better border security and keeping this nation safe".

The US government remains shut down, with many agencies and departments not working or working without pay after Congressional Democrats and the White House failed to reach agreement on a budget for 2019. Christopher Coons, D-Del., questioned on "Fox News Sunday" why McConnell has not taken a more active role.

While McConnell has been part of the process, he was not present outside the White House last week after talks between Trump and congressional leaders collapsed.

"Why is Mitch McConnell completely absent from these negotiations?"

Trump threatened anew that the shutdown could continue indefinitely.

Share