States Legalize Marijuana For Recreational Or Medical Use

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More than half of likely voters support the measure, according to recent polling, and MI would become the first state in the Midwest to legalize recreational marijuana if the measure succeeds.

In Utah and Missouri, voters on Tuesday decided that patients should have access to medical marijuana. The licensing authority is required to start accepting applications from would-be marijuana merchants with a year of that date, meaning that legal sales might begin sometime in 2020.

North Dakotans decisively rejected a proposal to make marijuana legal for recreational purposes.

To learn more about the proposal and the effects of legalizing marijuana, read Mark Peterson's in-depth report.

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MI voters have approved the legalization of recreational marijuana.

"This is yet another historic election for the movement to end marijuana prohibition", said Steve Hawkins, executive director of the Marijuana Policy Project, which played a leading role in organizing the MI initiative. Under the measure, adults can be in possession of 2.5 ounces of marijuana, a provision similar to the state's medical marijuana law that was approved in 2008.

Proposal 1 allows adults 21 or older to possess 2.5 ounces or less of marijuana in public, transfer that amount to other adults "without remuneration", possess up to 10 ounces at home, and grow up to 12 plants for personal consumption. Residents of Missouri will decide between three competing measures to legalize medicinal pot.

Permit retail sales of marijuana and edibles subject to a 10% tax, dedicated to implementation costs, clinical trials, schools, roads, and municipalities where marijuana businesses are located. Utah Gov. Gary Herbert (R) has called for a special session of the Utah Legislature in an effort to pass the compromise bill.

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