Here are the 40 airlines that fly the Boeing 737 MAX

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The advice is based on preliminary information gathered in the investigation of a Lion Air flight that crashed in Indonesia last week killing all 189 on board, a person familiar with the matter told Reuters.

Boeing said in a statement received at China's largest air show in Zhuhai that its bulletin to airlines underscored "existing flight crew procedures" created to address circumstances where information coming into the cockpit from the sensors was wrong.

Following the fatal crash of a Lion Air jet in Indonesia last week, Boeing has issued a warning to airlines operating its new 737 MAX about what to do in the event of an "angle-of-attack" sensor failure and avoid a unsafe nose-dive.

Indonesian investigators on Wednesday said the sensor was replaced on the Lion Air plane the day before its fatal flight and may have compounded other problems with the aircraft. If the flow is disrupted by a plane going too slowly or climbing too steeply, that can cause the plane to lose the lift required for flight and plummet.

A spokesperson for Boeing wouldn't disclose whether the directive was issued to operators of all Boeing aircraft, or just those who fly 737 MAX 8 planes - the same model as Flight 610.

This affects almost 250 aircraft flown by U.S. airlines like Southwest, American and United, the FAA said.

Boeing said in its statement that it had issued an operations manual bulletin (OMB) to 737 Max operators that advised flight crews to turn to existing procedures "where there is erroneous input from an AOA sensor".

The issue only occurs when a plane's autopilot is switched off, Boeing said.

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A week after an Indonesian low-priced airline Lion Air plane crashed killing 189 people, another of its aircraft was involved in an incident on Thursday, when it smashed into a pole during takeoff from an airport on Sumatra Island.

Jet Airways and SpiceJet now fly Boeing 737 MAX planes in India.

Data extracted from the flight recorders revealed that the aircraft experienced problems with airspeed indicators during its last four flights. If pilots aren't careful, they can cause severe nose-down trim settings that make it impossible to level a plane.

Safety investigators said the plane may have hit speeds of 600 miles per hour before hitting the water.

Airline safety experts said pilots are trained to handle a plane safely if those crucial sensors fail and backup systems are generally in place as well.

Indonesia's search and rescue agency on Wednesday extended the search effort for a second time, saying it will continue until Sunday.

In October, the tragic crash of Lion Air Flight JT610 brought the jet back to the forefront the public consciousness. The data from the flight recorder and Boeing's statement have provided the first clues, but rescuers are still searching for the device that records voices in the plane's cockpit.

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