U.S. airstrike wiped out al-Shabaab camp

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It should be noted that the report also says about the power of inflicted air strike.

AFRICOM added that "we now assess" no civilians were injured or killed as a result of the strike.

The strike came after a recent spate of attacks that Al-Shabab has conducted against Somali security forces and their United States advisers across the country.

This was the deadliest air strike since November 2017 when 100 militants were killed, the statement added.

According to a report by Daily Monitor, the strike took place close to where the U.S. forces train Somali troops in partnership with the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM).

"These sustained attacks demonstrate that Shabab retains the ability to launch conventional offensives, in addition to its terrorist attack capability", said Mr Bill Roggio, editor of FDD's Long War Journal, run by the Foundation for Defense of Democracies that tracks military strikes against militant groups.

Al-Shabab, which seeks to establish an Islamic state in Somalia, continues to hold parts of the country's south and central regions after being chased out of Mogadishu several years ago. Washington says its attacks target militants groups.

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So far this year in Somalia, the United States has conducted 27 strikes, including by drone attacks, mostly against small numbers of al-Shabab fighters.

Al-Shabab, which is linked to al-Qaeda, has not yet commented.

"Alongside our Somali and worldwide partners, we are committed to preventing al-Shabab from taking advantage of safe havens from which they can build capacity and attack the people of Somalia".

The US has some 500 troops in Somalia, primarily in advisory roles.

The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorised to speak to reporters.

At least two attacks involved U.S. aircraft.

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