Flu shot clinic now open

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The problem is that many parents are choosing not to vaccinate their kids because of misinformation about the flu shot.

The child, who died sometime between September 30 and October 6, tested positive for influenza B. He or she did not have any "known underlying medical conditions", the department said, adding the child's death marks the first flu-associated pediatric death of the 2018-19 season.

"We're all very open about the fact that the flu vaccine is not the greatest vaccine and we really need to make improvements in it", he said.

In 2003, Moise's 6-and-a-half-month-old son Ian died from flu complications.

While the Health Department expects its shipment of the flu mist to arrive in the next week or so, the flu shot is in stock and available. It takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies that protect against flu to develop in the body.

Influenza causes approximately 12,000 hospitalizations and 3,500 deaths in Canada every year.

Most pharmacies in the United States of America offer several FDA approved flu and vaccines. Last year, the most casualties were young and elderly people.

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"I think this year's, from what I read, looks like it might be a little more effective than last year", Fristo said.

It's the first reported pediatric death in Florida for the 2018-19 flu season.

Kelli Hillerman says the flu shot clinic involves almost 100 volunteers. But other studies have shown that people frequently express scepticism of vaccines or believe myths surrounding them.

Influenza or the flu is an illness caused by a virus.

Taking a pass on the flu shot could mean passing on the virus and the risk to others, Lambton Public Health says. Aside from protecting moms from getting the flu, vaccines can also protect babies from the illness after they were born.

30 percent of parents feel flu vaccines are a conspiracy.

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