Hurricane Florence from space: "A no-kidding nightmare"

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Gerst wrote. "It's chilling, even from space".

Astronaut Ricky Arnold captured this image of Hurricane Florence from the International Space Station on Monday, September 10, 2018.

That's because, on the ground, the storm has brought mayhem.

On Wednesday, forecasters projected Florence - now a category 4 hurricane - will likely slow down and turn south after slamming the East Coast.

Millions of people in the path of Hurricane Florence are frantically preparing for a monster storm that's anticipated to make landfall sometime early Saturday morning.

Because Hurricane Florence is so unbelievably massive, astronauts had to use a super wide-angle lens to capture photographs of the monstrous storm from space.

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Astronaut Alexander Gerst also joined in the fun, explaining that the fearless space men and women need wide-lense cameras to take these incredible photos.

From his orbiting perch, Gerst offered Earthlings yet another warning about the hurricane's dangers: "Get prepared on the East Coast, this is a no-kidding nightmare coming for you".

The video was taken on Tuesday as Florence churned across the Atlantic in a west-northwesterly direction with winds of 130 miles per hour.

It's the latest advisory - albeit from a different perspective - that residents from Maryland to Georgia should be prepared for a risky storm.

States of emergency have been issued in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and Maryland. On Tuesday, William "Brock" Long, head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, said Florence "could be the most risky storm in the history of the Carolinas".

The US National Hurricane Centre has warned that Hurricane Florence will bring "life-threatening, catastrophic flash flooding" to North and SC.

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