Study looks at boxer shorts versus underpants and sperm count

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The researchers also noted that the men who wore boxers had 14 percent lower levels of follicle stimulating hormone, compared with men who didn't. Those men had 25 percent higher sperm concentrations and 17 percent higher total sperm counts, compared with men who did not, the study found.

They sought to test the theory that briefs, being more constricting, raise scrotal temperature and have a negative effect on fertility.

That is not the only benefit for people who wear boxers or any loose-fitting underwear, these men also have a higher percentage of what is known as motile sperm.

Choice of underwear seemed to affect only the total count of the sperm and the other parameters remained unaffected.

The results showed that men who chose looser-fitting undergarments like boxers had a higher average sperm count and concentration than men who frequently wore briefs.

The reason briefs may impact sperm counts is that they keep the testes close to the body, Chavarro said.

We know what you're thinking. Along with hot Jacuzzis, tight briefs have been implicated in lowered fertility in men for a long time.

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The findings suggested that tight underwear may impair sperm production, the researchers wrote in the study, published today (Aug. 8) in the journal Human Reproduction.

But if that isn't enough to put men off of wearing them in favour of boxers, this new study just might. The rest wore tighter underwear. "Men who may benefit the most are men who've been trying a while and continue to struggle getting their partners pregnant". "There is a big difference between measuring aspects of sperm quality (as done in this study) and measuring fertility".

However, they said that there could be further factors that weren't included in the study.

That finding suggests that, in men who wear tighter underwear, decreased sperm production may send a signal to the brain to increase levels of FSH to compensate for the lower sperm production.

The conviction of the scientists reduced levels of this hormone in men who wear boxers, compared to those who have a more narrow trousers, due to the fact that spermiogenesis occurs normally and is not regulated by the high concentration of hormones, which takes effect at the time of damage of the scrotum is too narrow sheets.

Although this study adds new information in the ongoing battle of boxers versus briefs, there are a few important caveats, said Dr. Jennifer Kawwass, medical director of IVF and third party reproduction at the Emory Reproductive Center in Atlanta. But even if a study finds that something is linked with lower sperm counts, "does that actually translate to a lower ability to cause a pregnancy?"

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