Perseid meteor shower peaks Saturday, Sunday nights

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The meteors originate from the constellation of Perseus, which gives it its name. During the Sunday night peak, Steve said up to 60 meteors an hour (an average of one per minute) could be visible. Meteor showers are a great opportunity for time-lapse videos and long-exposure photography, allowing your shots of the night sky to turn into van Gogh-like paintings of this starry spectacle.

Attention stargazers: the most popular meteor shower of the year will happen this weekend.

According to NASA, just because this weekend is the peak of the meteor shower doesn't mean they can't be seen afterward. By night, most of any rain will exit with remnant cloud cover scattered around.

The Perseid meteor shower is created by debris from the Swift-Tuttle Comet as the Earth passes through the dust and debris it leaves behind during last week of July until mid-August every year.

Leftover clouds from any daytime storms may get in the way of our view at night. When the pieces of debris heat up as they enter the Earth's atmosphere.

You'll need to let your eyes adjust to the darkness. Speaking from experience, I used to watch the show as a kid living a mile from New York's JFK airport, and I generally saw a handful of meteors from my backyard with all the house lights turned off.

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The key to seeing a meteor is to take in as much sky as possible.

Meteor showers are named after the constellation of stars the meteors radiate from.

The short answer is, if you find a dark spot away from the streetlights and get your eyes adjusted, weather permitting, you might be able to see some.

A number of planets will also be highly visible. "The moon is very favorable for the Perseids this year, and that'll make the Perseids probably the best shower of 2018 for people who want to go out and view it".

And don't forget to grab your camera before you head out.

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