Massive rogue planet found lurking outside our solar system

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It doesn't appear to orbit a parent star, however, and is only 20 light-years away from Earth.

"This object is right at the boundary between a planet and a brown dwarf, or 'failed star, ' and is giving us some surprises that can potentially help us understand magnetic processes on both stars and planets", Melodie Kao, leader of the study and Hubble postdoctoral fellow at Arizona State University, said in a press release. Brown dwarf planets are sometimes called "failed stars" because they're almost large enough for fusion to begin taking place in their core, but that's not even the most unique thing about this particular planet. It also has a magnetic field about 200 times as strong as our infamously spotted neighbor's, driving auroras much like our own, except with a lack of a sun, SIMP's auroras are likely caused by magnetic play with one of its own moons. This finding is the first radio telescope finding of an object the mass of a planet found outside the Solar System.

Though it was first detected in 2016, scientists initially identified it as one of five recently discovered brown dwarfs.

The unusual object sits in a grey area between a star and a planet, and was originally classed as a "brown dwarf" - a failed star.

Finding a solitary planet - called a "rogue" planet - is more hard, but researchers just managed to spot one using a radio telescope, and it's a real weirdo.

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Of particular note is the presence of strong auroras, which typically involve a planet's magnetic field interacting with solar wind. It's an absolutely massive alien world that is almost big enough to be classified as a brown dwarf.

An unaccompanied brown dwarf like SIMP JO1365663+0933473, the object detected by the VLA, does not have a companion star and thus is not flying through a solar wind.

Brown dwarf masses are notoriously hard to measure, and at the time, the object was thought to be an old and much more massive brown dwarf. Latest measurements have established that the exoplanet has a surface temperature of 825 degrees Celsius (around 1517 degrees Fahrenheit), shows the International Business Times. It is a component of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO).

In fact, Kao's team says the exoplanet even has auroras, which give off radio emissions that the VLA has managed to pick up.

And, although it's 12.7 times more massive than Jupiter, it's only a little bit bigger, with a radius 1.22 times that of our gas giant.

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