KDHE reports first human cases of West Nile Virus Featured

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A mosquito pool in Bradford-West Gwillimbury has tested positive for the virus. The municipality, along with Swoyersville, Forty Fort, parts of Edwardsville and Kingston boroughs and Wilkes-Barre City will be sprayed in the early evening with AquaDUET, which is a type of insecticide that will reduce the adult mosquito populations that may carry West Nile Virus.

Use mosquito repellent, according to directions, when it is necessary to be outdoors.

Mosquitoes in more than a dozen cities and towns across the state have tested positive for West Nile.

West Nile virus is spread to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito. About one in five infected persons will have mild illness which may include fever, headache, body aches, joint pain, vomiting diarrhea or rash.

Mosquitoes are largely to blame for spreading West Nile virus. West Nile can become fatal if it progresses to a neuroinvasive disease, such as encephalitis and meningitis.

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The best way to prevent getting West Nile is to wear long sleeves and trousers and use insect repellant, especially at dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active.

Whenever outdoors between dusk and dawn, wear shoes and socks, long trousers and a long-sleeved shirt. Consult with a pediatrician or family physician for questions about the use of repellent on children, as repellent is not recommended for children under the age of two months.

Check for and fix any tears in residential screens, including porches and patios. "With more rain expected this week, it's important to remember we can keep mosquitoes from breeding and biting us in our own backyards if we pour out standing water after it rains and remove or turn over wheelbarrows and watering cans".

Make sure you have good screens on your windows and doors to keep mosquitoes out.

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