Mueller team indicts 12 Russian agents for hacking in 2016 election season

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Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who announced the indictments, said the Russians involved belonged to the military intelligence service GRU.

Special counsel Robert Mueller has indicted a dozen Russian intelligence officers in his probe into the Kremlin's meddling in the 2016 presidential election, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein announced Friday.

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein says that Russian intelligence agents stole information on 500,000 US voters after hacking a state USA election board.

DOJ says the hacking targeted Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign, Democratic National Committee and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, with the intention to "release that information on the internet under the names DCLeaks and Guccifer 2.0 and through another entity".

Mueller and a team of prosecutors have been working since May 2017 to determine if any Trump associates conspired with Russian Federation to interfere in the election. The indictment also alleges the GRU officers hacked into computers belonging to a company that supplies software used to verify voter information, and targeted local and state election offices.

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Deputy attorney general Rod Rosenstein has announced new indictments in the special counsel probe of Trump campaign ties to Russian Federation. Rosenstein added that he had briefed President Donald Trump on the indictment earlier this week.

The Russia investigation has now led to charges against 32 people, including previous charges against 14 Russian nationals for their work on spreading Russian-based propaganda. "When we confront foreign interference in American elections, it is important for us to avoid thinking politically as Republicans or Democrats and instead to think patriotically as Americans".

In his Friday announcement, Rosenstein called for an end to partisan fighting over the Russian Federation investigation, just one day after a Congressional panel grilled the former FBI agent Peter Strozk over his private text messages that were critical of Donald Trump.

President Trump told reporters a few few hours before Rosenstein spoke that he plans to bring up Russia's election interference campaign Monday with President Vladimir Putin when they meet in Helsinki, Finland.

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