Frank McKenna Says Trump's Treatment of Trudeau Is 'Appalling'

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President Donald Trump's top economic adviser says Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau "really kind of stabbed us in the back" when Trudeau said at the end of the Group of Seven summit that Canada wouldn't be pushed around by the USA and its trade tariffs.

Canada's House of Commons stood Monday in defiance of Donald Trump, denouncing his name-calling tirade against Justin Trudeau and endorsing the prime minister's firm response to protectionist US tariffs and tweeted presidential threats against dairy producers and automakers.

Trudeau had said after Trump's exit that Canada would retaliate against USA tariffs.

Merkel, fresh from the G-7 meeting in Canada, said those at the meeting were "firmly convinced that sustainable world economic development can only be achieved in cooperation and through win-win situations".

Trudeau did not immediately respond to the attacks, but his office said on Saturday after Trump withdrew support for the communique that the prime minister had not said anything in his closing news conference he has not said to Trump before.

"We finished the meeting, really everybody was happy, and I agreed to sign something", Trump said.

The Americans' criticism of Trudeau left a former Canadian prime minister, Stephen Harper, stumped.

On Monday, European Commission spokesman Margaritis Schinas said the EU "stands fully behind" the statement and "will continue to stand up for an global, rules-based, multilateral system". "I don't understand the obsession with trade relations with Canada", he said on Fox News, given that Canada is the biggest single buyer of American goods and services in the world.

"We have to keep a cool head now and draw the right conclusions", Maas said.

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Trump's top economic adviser, Larry Kudlow, suggested Trump saw Trudeau as trying to weaken his hand before the summit with North Korea's Kim Jong Un, saying the president won't "let a Canadian prime minister push him around".

She left no doubt that European Union nations will impose counter-measures on U.S. goods in response, but cautioned against tit-for-tat retaliation which might lead to a trade war.

The comments from Trudeau prompted Trump to criticize the Canadian leader on Twitter and decline to endorse the G7 communique.

"I know it didn't look friendly", Trump said.

European officials said Trump had tried to water down the language in the draft communique on the WTO and rules-based trade.

"In a matter of seconds, you can destroy trust with 280 Twitter characters", German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said when asked about Mr Trump's U-turn, adding it would take much longer to rebuild lost trust.

France is also standing by the G7 communique, a French presidency official said, adding anyone departing from the commitments made at the summit would be showing their "incoherence and inconsistency".

London Mayor Sadiq Khan said he hoped Trump would reconsider policies such as the recent increase in tariffs on steel and aluminum from Europe, China, Mexico, Canada and elsewhere. "And if it's not fixed, we're not going to deal with these countries".

As well, she said the government should accelerate work on its Plan B in the event that Trump blows up NAFTA or follows through on threats to impose tariffs on autos and auto parts - a move Ambrose said would be devastating to Canada's economy.

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