Consumers’ Internet Use Could Change As ‘Net Neutrality’ Ends

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Ellis SchumerDem leaders condemn Trump after reversal on G-7 communique endorsement Dem lawmaker: Trump conceding "role as leader of the free world" after G-7 summit Schumer: Trump "turning our foreign policy into an global joke" MORE (D-N.Y) is blaming congressional Republicans for the repeal of the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) net neutrality rules, a shift which goes into effect Monday.

Current FCC chairman Ajit Pai spearheaded the effort to return the internet to the way it was before the rules took effect, and despite the overwhelming support for keeping the rules intact, the FCC voted 3-2 to reverse course.

Public protests greeted the Federal Communications Commission's plan to end use of the rules, with many saying it could have an impact on free speech. The Internet & Television Association said over the summer that it supported net neutrality but did not believe that the Obama-era regulations promote it.

Under the new rules, the Federal Trade Commission will be the agency to handle complaints about broadband privacy and unfair or deceptive business practices by ISPs. "We agree that internet users should have the freedom to go anywhere on the internet or to run any application with confidence that internet traffic will in no way be blocked or throttled", the organization said in a statement.

Pai also called the new course of action a "tremendous bipartisan success" and noted that the rules were "especially harmful for smaller internet service providers who didn't have the means to withstand a regulatory onslaught".

ISPs have said they won't block or throttle legal websites, though they've left open the potential for charging more for some data delivery.

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The Republican-majority FCC voted along party lines in December to repeal the regulations, which expired today.

"Today, the Trump Administration has set into motion the destruction of the free and open Internet", she claimed.

Your ability to watch and use your favorite apps and services could start to change - though not right away - following Monday's official repeal of Obama-era internet protections.

As for Congress, the Senate issued a vote to overturn the decision in May and the House of Representatives now has the opportunity to do the same.

"We'll see what happens after the [midterm] election", Lewis says. "The Internet is coming for net neutrality". Several states, including New Jersey, Washington, Oregon and California, have gone so far as to push legislation to enforce the principles of net neutrality within their borders. In January, attorneys general in 22 states and the District of Columbia filed a protective petition for review of the order.

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