Nissan to withdraw from diesel vehicle market in Europe

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The data showed a sharp drop in demand for diesel cars in the United Kingdom, which is the second largest automotive market in Europe after Germany, where sales of diesel fuel also reduced.

Nissan has announced plans to begin phasing out diesel powertrains in Europe as it commits more investment to electric technology and alternative fuels.

Nissan Motor Co.'s decision to quit sales of diesel cars in Europe, where demand has slumped since Volkswagen's emissions cheating, is set to see more automakers join in. The city of Paris has already banned older diesels.

The auto industry and its suppliers are facing a global regulatory crackdown on diesel emissions and are adjusting their businesses, including investing heavily in electric vehicles.

Nissan sold 128,456 diesel cars in Europe past year, or about 16 percent of its total deliveries in the region, according to Bloomberg Intelligence.

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New diesel registrations in April were down 25 per cent compared to a year ago. In Ireland the diesel share of Nisssan's new auto registrations have fallen from 53 per cent of its total sales in 2015 to 37 per cent so far this year.

Interestingly, earlier sources reported that Nissan will cut hundreds of jobs at its plant in Sunderland, the largest auto plant in the United Kingdom because of falling demand for diesel models in Europe.

In particular, Toyota said in March that it will stop selling diesel passenger cars in Europe by the end of this year.

The industry still expects that heavier vehicles, such as delivery vans and pick-up trucks, will require diesel for many years to come due to their fuel economy requirements and the difficulty in creating efficient battery-driven alternatives. Why is there some life left in diesel according to Nissan?

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