Sydney bushfire deemed deliberate act

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Local resident Jordan Dodin climbs onto a roof to protect the house from fire in Wattle Grove on Saturday night.

The RFS is now advising residents in Pleasure Point, Sandy Point, Alfords Point, Barden Ridge, Voyager Point, Illawong, Menai & Bangor to "remain vigilant throughout the day and keep themselves up to date by checking the NSW RFS website".

"It is still an active fire ground but we are not seeing the sort of weather extremes, particularly with the wind that we saw yesterday", Rural Fire Service Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons told reporters in Sydney on Monday.

Southwest Sydney's bushfire alert has been downgraded, but fires continue to burn near homes.

"The good news is that the wind conditions will be easing, so we should see winds that are about half the speeds of what we had".

While no buildings have been destroyed, homes are under imminent threat.

Many residents in Menai made a decision to remain at their homes and were kept busy fighting ember attacks.

Exhausted firefighters are facing another "challenging and difficult" day battling a bushfire, believed to have been deliberately lit, that is still burning out of control south of Sydney.

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"So I'm sure everyone's been out checking their roof, making sure everything's wetted down and keep an eye on those spot fires".

The fire resulted in hundreds of people being evacuated from their homes on Saturday evening with flames nearly reaching properties at Holsworthy and Wattle Grove and spot fires later threatening Sutherland and Menai.

The blaze, which has been burning since Saturday, was downgraded from emergency to watch-and-act status overnight, but it has flared up again.

There's also a risk that winds could also pick up to 35km/h later today.

He said the aircraft had unfortunately already been returned to the United States because they were always sent back by the end of March when temperatures were traditionally cooler.

Police believe the fire may have been lit on goal and are appealing for witnesses to contact them.

"We're certainly looking to maximise the amount of time we have them here".

Fire and Rescue NSW commissioner Paul Baxter said it was "remarkable" there had been no major loss of property, and said community co-operation with authorities had been invaluable.

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