House Republicans reach opposite conclusion from intelligence community


"We found none", Mr Conaway said in an interview on Fox News Channel.

"We found no evidence of collusion".

Democrats on the Republican-controlled committee will likely issue a competing report, CNN reported.

The Intelligence Committee did find, however, that Russian Federation took active measures to meddle in the 2016 election, and that the majority expects it to undertake similar measures again. Conaway told reporters that he would give committee Democrats the report on Tuesday for their comments, suggestions and proposed changes, which he would take under advisement before presenting it to the intelligence community for redactions.

The Republican report will also say how "anti-Trump research" made its way from Russian sources to the Clinton campaign through the opposition research dossier on Trump and Russia.

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The Senate Intelligence Committee is also investigating the Russian intervention, and is expected to have a bipartisan report out in the coming weeks dealing with election security. Conaway did not suggest that Clinton knowingly coordinated with the Russians, but said the dossier clearly "would have hurt him and helped her".

The Wall Street Journal reported on Monday that the committee "has finished interviewing witnesses in its yearlong probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election, according to a person familiar with the matter, signaling the end is near of a contentious investigation that has revealed deep partisan divisions on the panel". Several witnesses including Bannon and White House Communications Director Hope Hicks curtailed their testimony and refused to answer questions about their time in Trump's White House.

There are still two committees in the Senate that are investigating Russia's 2016 election meddling: the Senate Intelligence and Judiciary Committees.

Committee Chairman Devin Nunes, a Republican released a controversial memo that alleged misconduct at the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Justice Department with regard to obtaining a FISA surveillance warrant in order to surveil the communications of a former Trump associate. Probes of the issue, by congressional committees and Special Counsel Robert Mueller, have shadowed Trump's first 14 months in office.