John Calipari updates Kevin Knox's status after being named in Yahoo report

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The father of Kentucky freshman Kevin Knox has denied a report that he or his son ever met with former NBA agent Andy Miller and his former associate Christian Dawkins, who are both involved in an FBI investigation into corruption in college basketball. "Once we do have additional information to share, we will communicate that when appropriate".

The Yahoo report lists Knox as one of the players that met or ate with Charles Dawkins, a former associate of Andy Miller and employee at ASM Sports.

Kentucky leading scorer Kevin Knox and former players Bam Adebayo and Nerlens Noel were among the players mentioned in a report by Yahoo Sports.

The documents list expenditures of former National Basketball Association agent Andy Miller, his former associate Dawkins and his agency, ASM Sports, according to Yahoo Sports.

John Calipari talks to Kevin Knox.

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"I haven't met with them yet, so I don't know", Calipari said. The Cats were beginning practice just after the press conference.

"I know nothing more than you guys know, so that's why there's no reason for me to speak", he said. Those documents say that Adebayo had been given a loan for $12,000 from the agency while still in high school, and another $36,500 after.

We discussed the story and how Kentucky fans should feel about where things stand.

Knox, a 6-foot-9 forward from Tampa, Fla., leads Kentucky in scoring with 15.4 points per game. It appears Dawkins paid for the meals, which could be an important distinction.

Yahoo said Friday that the documents obtained in discovery during the investigation link current players including Michigan State's Miles Bridges, Duke's Wendell Carter and Alabama's Collin Sexton to potential benefits that would be violations of NCAA rules, the Associated Press reported.

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