Iran urged to respect protestors' rights, end Internet crackdown

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Trump tweeted that "the U.S.is watching" the ongoing anti-government demonstrations across Iran, blaming the nuclear deal struck with the support of former President Obama for, he said, lining the pockets of the Iranian government.

The Iranian people have endured decades of political repression by an autocratic, Islamist government.

"Counterrevolution groups and foreign media are continuing their organized efforts to misuse the people's economic and livelihood problems and their legitimate demands to provide an opportunity for unlawful gatherings and possibly chaos", state TV said of the protests.

There aren't as many Iranians demonstrating this time around as there were in 2009, when millions took to the streets to protest the re-election of hardliner Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

Nikki Haley read out excerpts of chants she said were from Iranian protesters.

Iranian women hold Iran national flags as they take part in a stat organized rally against anti-government protests in the country, in the city of Ahvaz, south west Iran, Jan. 3, 2018.

Iran 's UN Ambassador Gholamali Khoshroo said in a letter that the United States government "has stepped up its acts of intervention in a grotesque way in Iran 's internal affairs under the pretext of providing support for sporadic protests, which in several instances were hijacked by infiltrators". Iran's Revolutionary Court handles cases involving alleged attempts to overthrow the government.

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Iran's supreme leader has blamed the protests racking his country on "enemies of Iran" who he said were meddling in its internal affairs.

"The economic situation is bad, people are suffering, people are not seeing results", said Ariannejad, who has lived in Canada for about 20 years but has family in Iran. Ismaeil Kowsari, deputy commander for Sarallah Base, an Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) unit in charge of security for Tehran, said that for now Iran's police forces are conducting security for Tehran.

The president of Iran, Hassan Rouhani, has also made an intervention in recent days.

An Iranian government campaign against protesters led to the deaths of at least 21 people over the past week. Such rifles are common in the Iranian countryside, according to The Associated Press, but it was not clear if the IRGC member was the same police officer reportedly shot on Monday night.

At least 30 people were killed and thousands arrested in the wave of protests, which drew the largest crowds in Iran since the Islamic Revolution of 1979.

President Trump tweeted, "such respect for the #People Of Iran as they try to take back their corrupt government".

The Mehr news agency reported Sunday that the two protesters were killed in Doroud, in Iran's Lorestan province. Hundreds of people have been arrested and a prominent judge warned on Tuesday that some could face the death penalty. The U.S. called the United Nations meeting on Friday, portraying the protests as a human rights issue that could spill over into an worldwide problem. She continued by saying, "If the Iranian dictatorship's history is any guide, we can expect more outrageous abuses in the days to come".

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